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So You Want to Be Certified

There is no denying the ever-increasing emphasis on energy efficiency in today’s home building. From the environmentally conscious to those just looking to save money on utilities, this trend is also connected with timber frame home building. In fact, many future homeowners have even chosen to go beyond energy efficiency and aim for certification. Today we will tell you a little about a Riverbend timber frame home’s energy efficiency and how that plays into certification.

Energy Efficiency and Timber Framing

EnerGuide Home

Quebec City EnerGuide Home

Riverbend’s traditional timber framing is known for its form-fitting connections, but the individual timbers are not the only elements of our designs that fit together well. Insulspan brand Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) and Advantage Insulated Concrete Forms(ICFs) are also key features that when incorporated with the timber skeleton, create a complete shell which is strong, enduring, and energy efficient. Having a complete, insulated shell like this becomes one of the more crucial conditions for most energy efficiency certifications.

Certifying Riverbend Homes

One of the best ways to determine the level of energy efficiency your home achieves is to use a program by a certified third party. There are several well-known programs that can be used, all with their own ways of identifying a home’s energy efficiency, including Energy Star, LEED, and EnerGuide in Canada.

As a Riverbend example, this Quebec City couple wanted to build their custom timber frame farmhouse so that it was not only unique, but also energy efficient for the cold climate of their region. By following the Canadian EnerGuide guidelines, they were able to achieve an 86 on EnerGuide’s rating system—where anything above 80 is excellent and 90 and above is considered a zero-energy home.

LEED Home

Michigan LEED Platinum certified home

Bob Burnside of Michigan is another client example who sought to attain certification. In addition to the tight envelope, his home design including features like two geothermal systems to manage the internal climate and solar panels. With these inclusions Bob’s home achieved a platinum level certification from USGBC’s LEED certification program—the highest level that can be achieved.

Resale Values and Energy Efficiency

You can still reap the benefits of a certified home, even if you choose to sell it down the road. According to a survey reported by the Washington Post, existing homes with certification can sell for 30% more than a non-certified home. Due to the natural benefits of a certified home like; minimized impact on the environment, tax incentives, money savings, and a healthier living space, a home’s potential resale value becomes a great reason to look into certification.

 

For more information, view our energy efficiency page.